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Month: July 2019

Health checks in .netCore web APIs

Previously I have been writing health check controllers by hand. Now .netCore has a simple way of managing service health checks via middleware. You can test everything is operational all the way down to the database. You can even write your own custom checks in a few lines. A simple service operational health check can be enabled by adding two lines to your startup.cs file. One in the services configuration and one in the application configuration. The “/health” parameter specifies the route to be used for the health check. When navigating to the route, a message will be displayed on…

Running web apps in a Docker container

Running web apps in a Docker container requires a little more set up than just running your standard back end services. This method requires that your app be wrapped by .netCore as recommended by Microsoft when creating a SPA. This allows you to deploy everything as a simple DLL. The only change that is required from a normal container deployment for a back end service is the container itself. Most front end frameworks these days use NodeJS. We either need to ensure that this is already installed on the container image we are using, or install it in the container.…

Kubernetes – Terminology

If you haven’t worked with Kubernetes or any orchestration system before, starting can be a bit like jumping in the deep end of a pool. Most developers won’t have been exposed to the terminology spread throughout the product This can make figuring out what is going on all the more difficult. Below I have tried to give a simple high-level overview of the main components of Kube, and the relationships between them. The node This is a worker machine – or minion. This is usually a VM or physical piece of hardware and is where your programs are run. The…